THE ESTATE

Stoke Edith was once the principal manor of Sir Henry Lingen (1612 – 1662), Royalist cavalier who commanded Goodrich castle during the Civil War. Lingen's widow, Alice, sold the manor to the ironmaster Thomas Foley in 1670, who settled it on his second son Paul.

Paul obtained a licence from James II to empark up to 500 acres at Stoke Edith, and began building a fine house in the William & Mary style of the 1690's in place of the former half-timbered house.

The Foley family have employed several famous designers and landscape architects ranging from George London in the 1690's, to William Nesfield in the 1860's; some of their work can still be seen on the Stoke Edith Estate today. The greatest surviving influence is the work of Humphrey Repton and John Nash, who together met for the first time at Stoke Edith while employed by Hon Edward Foley. Repton's planting schemes of the 1790's provide some of today's best shooting drives, such as Park Point. The commitment to landscaping and high quality forestry continues in the twenty first century.

Stoke Park was destroyed by fire in 1927. The present Stoke Edith House, enlarged in the Queen Anne style by

the Foleys, now gives host to our shoot parties with a dedicated gun room giving an ideal setting and ambience to our shooting parties.

Stoke Park was destroyed by fire in 1927. The present Stoke Edith House, enlarged in the Queen Anne style by the Foleys, now gives host to our shoot parties with a dedicated gun room giving an ideal setting and ambience to our shooting parties.

Stoke Edith has a very distinctive tower to its church and serves well as a local landmark. Even a gun, trying to find the Gun Room on a cold winter's morning could not fail to see it as it is directly beside Stoke Edith House. Interestingly, the height of this tower is 60yds and it has often been discussed at lunch when birds are regularly presented and shot above this height.

Lying in the stunning English county of Herefordshire, the village and estate of Stoke Edith is easily accessible through national road and rail networks. The Stoke Edith Estate makes the perfect Sporting Estate with the established planting of woodland and cover now playing its part in combination with the excellent topography to produce first class sport.